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The Politics of Rage

Black and Brown rage is often dehumanized, while White rage is protected and coddled. But it takes courage to transmute rage and anger into collective and lasting transformation. ILLUSTRATION BY MOREMAR/ADOBE STOCK do you thinkcalling me ‘angry’is an insult.every time you call me ‘angry’i hear your voice salt with guilt andi laugh.look how easy it is to reveal you.—anger is a healthy and natural response … Continue reading The Politics of Rage

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How Artists are Transforming Climate-Related Storytelling

BY BREANNA DRAXLER & KATE SCHIMEL Silhouetted human and animal figures cross a burning, orange screen, as a narrator repeats the Bible’s exhortation to “be fruitful and multiply … to fill the earth and subdue it.”  “So why would the industries stop exploiting the Earth if it is our divine right to do so?” the narrator asks, as black talons reach for the viewer.  Part of the Climate … Continue reading How Artists are Transforming Climate-Related Storytelling

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Migrant workers are flipping the script and using Photovoice to tell their own stories

Migrant men work in the strawberry fields. (This is Evidence), Author provided Reena Kukreja, Queen’s University, Ontario What happens when undocumented Bangladeshi and Pakistani men in Greece pick up their cell phones to record their lives as migrant agricultural workers? “This will let the people learn how we live our lives here,” said one of the men, referring to the photos and videos they were … Continue reading Migrant workers are flipping the script and using Photovoice to tell their own stories

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Why Canada shuttered some mackerel and spring herring fisheries in Québec and Atlantic Canada

Spring herring and Atlantic mackerel fisheries are among the most lucrative in the Gulf of St. Lawrence, and brought in more than $1.3 billion to Québec and Atlantic fishers in 2020. (Shutterstock) Dominique Robert, Université du Québec à Rimouski (UQAR) and Pablo Brosset, Institut Agro Rennes-Angers The announcement by the Department of Fisheries and Oceans to suspend fishing for Atlantic mackerel and spring herring in … Continue reading Why Canada shuttered some mackerel and spring herring fisheries in Québec and Atlantic Canada

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To reduce corporate emissions, CEOs need to be bold risk takers

Carbon-emitting companies are significant contributors to the climate crisis. (AP Photo/Charlie Riedel) Ashrafee Tanvir Hossain, Memorial University of Newfoundland Climate change is widely recognized as one of the most profound challenges ever to face the human race and life on Earth. Among the different factors identified by climate scientists, greenhouse gas emissions — which have doubled since 1990 — are the main contributors to global … Continue reading To reduce corporate emissions, CEOs need to be bold risk takers

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No time to waste: We need to start prioritizing solid waste management in First Nation communities

A garbage dump fire is seen smouldering across the bay from the city of Iqaluit on July 9, 2014. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian Wyld Anderson Assuah, University College of the North Last year, Harry Towtongie, the mayor of Rankin Inlet, Nunavut, bemoaned how toxic substances released from the community’s dumpsite into the nearby ocean have been harming local food sources. He said the dumpsite was full … Continue reading No time to waste: We need to start prioritizing solid waste management in First Nation communities

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The window of opportunity to address increasing drought and expanding drylands is vanishing

Margot Hurlbert, University of Regina Chile, Argentina and the American West are in the midst of a decade-long, megadrought — the driest conditions those regions have seen in a century. And many areas in Western Canada and the United States are experiencing extreme drought — a once in 20-year event. Drought makes agriculture less productive, reduces crop yields and increases heat-related deaths. It adds to … Continue reading The window of opportunity to address increasing drought and expanding drylands is vanishing

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Canada’s marine conservation toolbox needs an overhaul to counter climate change

Andrea Bryndum-Buchholz, Memorial University of Newfoundland and Kristina Boerder, Dalhousie University The impacts of climate change are becoming increasingly pervasive, bringing Canada’s lack of preparedness in its marine conservation measures into focus. The North Atlantic right whales — one of the most endangered large whales found off the eastern shores of Canada — are now changing their habits and traditions. Their pursuit of their favourite … Continue reading Canada’s marine conservation toolbox needs an overhaul to counter climate change

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Diamond mines in the Northwest Territories are not a girl’s best friend

A woman examines a diamond she is in the process of cutting and polishing in Yellowknife, N.W.T. in a photo from 2003. (CP PHOTO/Bob Weber) Rebecca Hall, Queen’s University, Ontario Almost three years ago, the National Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls (MMIWG) released its final report and among its findings, the report identified resource extraction as a site of gender violence. … Continue reading Diamond mines in the Northwest Territories are not a girl’s best friend

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Weaving is helping strengthen ancestral knowledge among women and children in Ingapirca, Ecuador

Women trace ancestral memories using wool. (Monica Malo), Author provided Cristina Delgado Vintimilla, York University, Canada and Veronica Pacini-Ketchabaw, Western University In the remote Andean community of El Cisne in Ingapirca, Ecuador, one of the first things you’ll notice is children’s laughter. In a courtyard, women gather with their children to trace ancestral knowledge and memories — and they do this using wool. The alpaca … Continue reading Weaving is helping strengthen ancestral knowledge among women and children in Ingapirca, Ecuador

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Women Against the Bomb: Mothers of the Revolution

BY VALERIE SCHLOREDT “Protect and Survive,” an information campaign published by the British government in 1980, informed the public of how “to make your home and your family as safe as possible under nuclear attack.” Part of the plan advised civilians to prop suitcases against the walls, stuffed with clothes and books “to absorb the radiation.” In the event of incoming nuclear missiles, the government would … Continue reading Women Against the Bomb: Mothers of the Revolution

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No time to waste: We need to start prioritizing solid waste management in First Nation communities

Anderson Assuah, University College of the North Last year, Harry Towtongie, the mayor of Rankin Inlet, Nunavut, bemoaned how toxic substances released from the community’s dumpsite into the nearby ocean have been harming local food sources. He said the dumpsite was full and overflowing, and must be decommissioned before a new one is built, but financial support is not readily available. Many First Nations, northern … Continue reading No time to waste: We need to start prioritizing solid waste management in First Nation communities

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Native American Storytelling, One Pint at a Time

BY JONATHAN SHIPLEY In the beginning, there was Selu. She was the first woman, made from a corn plant. The Cherokee goddess was killed by her twin sons, who feared her power, but her dying instructions taught her family how to grow corn so they might survive and so her spirit would live on, resurrected with each harvest. This story is told by Morgan Crisp, who … Continue reading Native American Storytelling, One Pint at a Time

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CEOs are hindering LGBTQ+ equality in the workplace

Ashrafee Tanvir Hossain, Memorial University of Newfoundland https://narrations.ad-auris.com/widget/the-conversation-canada/ceos-are-hindering-lgbtq+-equality-in-the-workplace Global acceptance of homosexuality has risen over the past two decades to 72 per cent in 2019 from 51 per cent in 2002. Despite this, a report from last year found that majority of American LGBTQ+ workers have faced job discrimination. This echoes an earlier report, published by the Canadian Centre for Diversity and Inclusion in 2015, … Continue reading CEOs are hindering LGBTQ+ equality in the workplace

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How early childhood education is responding to climate change

Veronica Pacini-Ketchabaw, Western University To the untrained eye, the small community garden on Coast and Straits Salish territory — on what passersby commonly know as the University of Victoria campus — might look unruly. Bursting with dandelions, lamb’s ear and grasses, it’s difficult to tell where the garden starts and where it ends. Wondering where those boundaries begin and end has been a fruitful challenge … Continue reading How early childhood education is responding to climate change

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Here’s how food waste can generate clean energy

Salvador Escobedo Salas, Western University Food waste is a growing problem in Canada and many other parts of the world — and it is only expected to get worse in the coming years. The world population is expected to grow to 9.7 billion by 2050, alongside global food demand. Not only will this create large amounts of food and municipal organic waste, but there will … Continue reading Here’s how food waste can generate clean energy

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#ToxicWorkplaces: The future of youth employment in Nigeria

Grace Adeniyi-Ogunyankin, Queen’s University, Ontario Since Nigeria declared its aspiration to be one of the world’s top 20 economies by 2020, I have been doing research on the damaging impact of urban restructuring and economic growth on marginalized urban women in Ibadan, Nigeria. However, in the past four years, my interest has widened to include the impact of the same issues on Nigerian youth. I … Continue reading #ToxicWorkplaces: The future of youth employment in Nigeria

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What Holistic Care for Refugees Looks Like

To view the refugee crisis from an attachment lens is to become aware of how forced migration trauma will shape child refugees’ relationships later as adults—even after rebuilding their lives over time. ILLUSTRATION BY MALTE MUELLER By GABES TORRES Flee tells the story of Amin, a man who fled the war in Afghanistan as a child refugee. The docudrama is mostly an animation, with a conversation … Continue reading What Holistic Care for Refugees Looks Like

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Unlearning Racism As a Non-Black Person of Color

Gabrielle is photographed at Lincoln Park on West Main Street in the St. Charles section of Chicago, Illinois. That park was the location of the BLM protests in her town. The school you can see in the background was her grade school, where she was bullied. PHOTO BY ANJALI PINTO By Gabrielle Ghaderi The first time I learned about the history of race and racism … Continue reading Unlearning Racism As a Non-Black Person of Color

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To Save a Forest, Look to the Women

BY VERONIKA PERKOVÁ Ninfa Carianil Damaso, first female forest ranger of Fundación ProAves, poses in front of a nature preservation sign. Women often suffer the most from environmental degradation. A nonprofit in Colombia is trying to make their needs central to conservation. Sara Inés Lara, leader of Colombia-based bird conservation organization Fundación ProAves, got her first taste of conservation’s potential more than 30 years ago. She grew … Continue reading To Save a Forest, Look to the Women

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Mutual aid in a global food crisis: Rural South African women work together

Elizabeth Vibert, University of Victoria Stark warnings of a looming global food crisis spark fear as millions of people will likely descend into hunger in the coming months. As the New York Times put it, for the global food supply “there are few worse countries to be in conflict than Russia and Ukraine.” Nearly 50 nations, many low-income and numerous in Africa, depend on these … Continue reading Mutual aid in a global food crisis: Rural South African women work together

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Failure to include Black communities in health policy public engagement perpetuates health disparities

Alpha Abebe, McMaster University and Rhonda C. George, McMaster University It is time for us to accept that policy failure and lack of community engagement in policy decision-making go hand-in-hand. The fact that the communities with the worst health outcomes are also the communities least likely to be meaningfully engaged in health policy decision-making should not be a surprise. As it stands, a growing body … Continue reading Failure to include Black communities in health policy public engagement perpetuates health disparities

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Close to home: The Canadian far right, COVID-19 and social media

Merlyna Lim, Carleton University and Brandon Rigato, Carleton University Weeks after the so-called “freedom convoy” protests ended, a familiar quietness has returned to the streets of downtown Ottawa. No more sounds of blaring horns and people partying into the wee hours. The only remaining visible traces are abandoned trucks in impound yards and barriers on streets. But these too will be cleared, just like the … Continue reading Close to home: The Canadian far right, COVID-19 and social media

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新冠疫情对义乌外贸的影响

作者:熊书逸

“现在商贸城里几乎都没什么人了。你看这才十二月底,就有好多商户都关门回家过年去了。”做布料生意的王先生叹着气说道。“要是前几年,过年前的这几天是最忙的时候。”

王老板的现状,是义乌国际商贸城上万个商铺的典型代表。传说中的“义乌小商品批发市场”实际包括好几个实体市场,其中最大也是最著名的就是义乌国际商贸城。

被誉为“世界超市”的义乌,连接着200万家中小企业,经营着170万个单品,商品出口到全球200多个国家和地区。

然而,一场突如其来的新冠肺炎疫情迫使人们的生活按下了暂停键。这场疫情对国际贸易产生了巨大的影响,而义乌作为贸易链中的一环,似乎也遇到了危机。

Continue reading “新冠疫情对义乌外贸的影响”
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Revolutionary changes in transportation, from electric vehicles to ride sharing, could slow global warming – if they’re done right, IPCC says

Alan Jenn, University of California, Davis Around the world, revolutionary changes are under way in transportation. More electric vehicles are on the road, people are taking advantage of sharing mobility services such as Uber and Lyft, and the rise in telework during the COVID-19 pandemic has shifted the way people think about commuting. Transportation is a growing source of the global greenhouse gas emissions that … Continue reading Revolutionary changes in transportation, from electric vehicles to ride sharing, could slow global warming – if they’re done right, IPCC says

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The colour of someone’s skin doesn’t equate to definitive sameness

Warren Clarke, University of Manitoba Despite the highly publicized 2020 murder of George Floyd and subsequent calls for change, many people of non-African descent around the world have yet to consider the lasting impacts of anti-Black racism. Anti-Black racism is rooted in the enslavement and historical experiences of people of African descent. It continues to harm Black people and communities, “othering” their existence while creating … Continue reading The colour of someone’s skin doesn’t equate to definitive sameness

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How Québec’s abandoned logging roads are damaging lakes, rivers and streams — and putting wildlife at risk

Sylvain Jutras, Université Laval For more than 25 years, the Québec Ministry of Forests, Wildlife and Parks has had a very effective tool to make its forest industry more competitive than other provinces. Québec has not implemented a single forest road management plan since the mid-1990s. This has allowed the government and the forest companies operating in the province’s public forests to save money, but … Continue reading How Québec’s abandoned logging roads are damaging lakes, rivers and streams — and putting wildlife at risk

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The economic case for the mining industry to support carbon taxation

Sally Innis, University of British Columbia; Benjamin Cox, University of British Columbia; John Steen, University of British Columbia, and Nadja Kunz, University of British Columbia As governments try to navigate a path to a safe climate in the 21st century, the public debate has focused on net zero, carbon taxes, electrification and renewable energy. Mining is rarely an anchor point of the discussion, even though … Continue reading The economic case for the mining industry to support carbon taxation

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The cultural sector needs support in order to benefit from a digital remake

Ricard Gil, Queen’s University, Ontario The COVID-19 crisis has dealt a massive blow to the cultural and creative sectors in Canada and around the world. The impact was broad and deep. In 2020, museums were closed for an average of more than 155 days, and in 2021, many of them had to shut their doors again, resulting in a 70 per cent drop in attendance. … Continue reading The cultural sector needs support in order to benefit from a digital remake

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Sustainable fashion expert: why I’m cutting my wardrobe down to ten items this month

Amber Martin-Woodhead, Coventry University The rise of fast fashion has led to huge increases in the amount of clothes made, bought and thrown away. Between 80 and 100 billion items of clothing are made globally each year. Greenhouse gas emissions from textile production are greater than those from international flights and the shipping industry combined, making the fashion industry a significant contributor to climate change. … Continue reading Sustainable fashion expert: why I’m cutting my wardrobe down to ten items this month

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More than entertainment: Indigenous women are teaching through filmmaking

Jocelyn Thorpe, University of Manitoba and Kaila Johnston, University of Manitoba Boys fish with their mother and grandmother. A young woman trains as a mixed martial artist. Relay riders race horses around a track, leaping from horse to horse. A twelve-year-old navigates the Oka Crisis. A mother joins an underground freedom movement in order to get her daughter back. A young girl learns she can … Continue reading More than entertainment: Indigenous women are teaching through filmmaking

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The importance of Indigenous storytelling in tales of post-apocalyptic survival

Krista Collier-Jarvis, Dalhousie University https://narrations.ad-auris.com/widget/the-conversation-canada/the-importance-of-indigenous-storytelling-in-tales-of-post-apocalyptic-survival With many provinces across Canada lifting vaccine and mask mandates, anxieties are high. If COVID-19 is becoming endemic, we must search for what philosopher Jonathan Lear calls “radical hope.” However, alongside trauma and particularly in times of pandemics throughout history, hope can take the form of stories about resilience. And for Indigenous people in particular, who have disproportionately experienced the … Continue reading The importance of Indigenous storytelling in tales of post-apocalyptic survival

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世界各地的少数民族是如何进行文化传承的?

作者:黄雨瑄、梁好、周琛佶

“人类的集体文化遗产不仅包括许多人都听说过的重要遗址,还包括众多独特的少数民族文化。在下个世纪,世界上 50% 到 90%的语言都将消亡,其中大部分都是少数民族语言。如果现在不采取行动,我们的子孙后代将再也无缘看到世界文化的多样性。”来自少数群体权利国际组织(Minority Group International)的政策和传播总监索德伯格强调说。

在世界范围内,少数民族群体占全球总人口的6.2%。这里所指的少数民族群体是某地区最初定居的族群,也被称作“原住民”。他们是世界文化多样性的重要组成部分。

Continue reading “世界各地的少数民族是如何进行文化传承的?”
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A South African company addresses vaccine supply inequity, despite Canada’s lack of support

Matthew Herder, Dalhousie University and E. Richard Gold, McGill University https://narrations.ad-auris.com/widget/the-conversation-canada/a-south-african-company-addresses-vaccine-supply-inequity–despite-canada-s-lack-of-support Since late 2020, the inequitable access across the globe to COVID-19 vaccines has been a glaring problem. But a remarkable achievement earlier this month offers hope that the supply of vaccines to developing countries will improve: Afrigen Biologics, a South African based company, produced its own version of Moderna’s mRNA COVID-19 vaccine. This was … Continue reading A South African company addresses vaccine supply inequity, despite Canada’s lack of support

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Data from thousands of surveillance cameras confirms that protected areas safeguard species diversity

Cheng Chen, University of British Columbia and Cole Burton, University of British Columbia We have entered what some scientists refer to as Earth’s sixth major extinction. Human disturbances, such as over-harvesting of crops, habitat destruction and invasive species, are the biggest drivers of biodiversity loss. Some studies estimate that the current species extinction rate is 1,000 times the normal background rate. One of the most … Continue reading Data from thousands of surveillance cameras confirms that protected areas safeguard species diversity

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Can we raise livestock sustainably? A win-win solution for climate change, deforestation and biodiversity loss

Vivian Arguelles Gonzalez, McGill University We know that eating burgers and steaks can have a negative impact on the environment. Our food system accounts for a quarter of all greenhouse gas emissions, with livestock responsible for at least two-thirds of agricultural emissions in North America, Asia, Europe and Oceania. Livestock has been blamed for contributing to deforestation, biodiversity loss, competition for edible grains and poor … Continue reading Can we raise livestock sustainably? A win-win solution for climate change, deforestation and biodiversity loss

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Rapidly increasing climate change poses a rising threat to mental health, says IPCC

Ashlee Cunsolo, Memorial University of Newfoundland; Breanne Aylward, University of Alberta, and Sherilee Harper, University of Alberta Climate change poses serious risks to mental well-being. For the first time, a new climate report by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) has assessed how climate change is having widespread and cumulative effects on mental health globally. Over the past decade, research and public interest on … Continue reading Rapidly increasing climate change poses a rising threat to mental health, says IPCC

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Using artificial intelligence in health sciences education requires interdisciplinary collaboration and risk assessment

Elif Bilgic, McMaster University and Jason M. Harley, McGill University Over the past five years, there has been an increase in research and development related to the use of artificial intelligence (AI) in health sciences education in fields such as medicine, nursing and occupational therapy. AI-enhanced technologies have been shown to have educational value and offer flexibility for students. For example, learning scenarios can be … Continue reading Using artificial intelligence in health sciences education requires interdisciplinary collaboration and risk assessment

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How LGBTQ2+ 1980s dance parties sparked collective joy and power — and can again

Craig Jennex, Ryerson University As we dream of the lives we might once live again when the COVID-19 pandemic wanes, I find myself most excited about potential experiences of collective effervescence — the hopeful feelings that arise from a shared sense of belonging with others. Having kept our distance over the last two years to keep each other safe, these spontaneous moments of communal joy … Continue reading How LGBTQ2+ 1980s dance parties sparked collective joy and power — and can again

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How to Address Poverty Among Latinx Children

Shantel is a Dominican immigrant and single mother, whose 8-year-old daughter is a U.S. citizen. They have lived in New York City public housing and received financial assistance since Shantel lost her job in mid-2021 after an accident. The two currently still rely on those services. “Once I had my foot surgery in June, I had to apply for unemployment, because I couldn’t receive [both] … Continue reading How to Address Poverty Among Latinx Children

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Digital sound archives can bring extinct birds (briefly) back to life

Hannah Hunter, Queen’s University, Ontario When people think of extinct animals, they may picture taxidermy, skeletons, 19th-century illustrations or perhaps grainy black-and-white photographs. Until very recently, these were our only ways to encounter lost beings. However, technological advances are making it possible to encounter extinct species in new ways. With a few clicks, we can listen to their voices. In September 2021, the U.S. Fish … Continue reading Digital sound archives can bring extinct birds (briefly) back to life

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‘I am back to square one’: How COVID-19 impacted recently resettled Yazidi and Syrian refugees

Leah Hamilton, Mount Royal University and Pallavi Banerjee, University of Calgary The COVID-19 pandemic has revealed and exacerbated existing challenges and vulnerabilities across Canada’s immigration system. It has placed an uneven burden on refugees, including temporary halts on Canada’s resettlement efforts and has increased their risk of COVID-19 infection. Beyond higher infection rates, how did lockdowns, school closures and the economic downturn impact refugees who … Continue reading ‘I am back to square one’: How COVID-19 impacted recently resettled Yazidi and Syrian refugees

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IPCC report: Half the world is facing water scarcity, floods and dirty water — large investments are needed for effective solutions

Balsher Singh Sidhu, University of British Columbia More than half the world’s population faces water scarcity for at least one month every year. Meanwhile, some people have to deal with too much water, while others have access to only poor water quality. That’s billions of people living with drought in Africa and India, facing flood risks in Bangladesh or lacking clean water due to excessive … Continue reading IPCC report: Half the world is facing water scarcity, floods and dirty water — large investments are needed for effective solutions

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Data from thousands of surveillance cameras confirms that protected areas safeguard species diversity

Cheng Chen, University of British Columbia and Cole Burton, University of British Columbia We have entered what some scientists refer to as Earth’s sixth major extinction. Human disturbances, such as over-harvesting of crops, habitat destruction and invasive species, are the biggest drivers of biodiversity loss. Some studies estimate that the current species extinction rate is 1,000 times the normal background rate. One of the most … Continue reading Data from thousands of surveillance cameras confirms that protected areas safeguard species diversity

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Where a Free Meal for Food-Insecure Families Is Just a Text Away

“One of the biggest misconceptions is that we have to be a nonprofit to address food insecurity,” says Adam Dole, co-founder of Bento. PHOTO COURTESY OF BENTO In May 2021, Chelsea Vasquez and her mother caught two metro buses from their Inglewood, California, home to St. John’s Well Child & Family Center clinic, where they had appointments to receive their first doses of the COVID-19 … Continue reading Where a Free Meal for Food-Insecure Families Is Just a Text Away

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When Witnessing Becomes Activism

Protestor’s at a Black Lives Matter demonstration. PHOTO BY BRAXTON DANIELS In May of 2020, 17-year-old Darnella Frazier was in front of a local market in Minneapolis, Minnesota, when she saw a White police officer pin a Black man to the ground. She pulled out her phone and pressed record and stood there for more than nine minutes, silently documenting George Floyd’s murder. Frazier’s split-second … Continue reading When Witnessing Becomes Activism

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How autonomous underwater robots can spot oil plumes after an ocean spill

Neil Bose, Memorial University of Newfoundland and Jimin Hwang, University of Tasmania On April 20, 2010, the offshore oil rig Deepwater Horizon exploded, burned, sank in the Gulf of Mexico and terrified the world. This horrific accident — recorded as the largest oil spill in history — killed 11 workers and released 210 million gallons of crude oil into the ocean. While about a half … Continue reading How autonomous underwater robots can spot oil plumes after an ocean spill

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In Mexico, how erasing Black history fuels anti-Black racism

Marycarmen Lara Villanueva, University of Toronto https://narrations.ad-auris.com/widget/the-conversation-canada/in-mexico–how-erasing-black-history-fuels-anti-black-racism In early 2021, a Ghanaian migrant known as Faruku died in the northern Mexican city of Tijuana, near the Mexico-United States border, of an apparent stroke. This was after being turned away from a hospital and later being asked to pay for an ambulance before it would assist him. A report from Refugees International notes that the circumstances … Continue reading In Mexico, how erasing Black history fuels anti-Black racism

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Masking in schools: A doctor and COVID-19 researcher explains how it keeps children safe

Julian Daniel Sunday Willett, McGill University https://narrations.ad-auris.com/widget/the-conversation-canada/masking-in-schools–a-doctor-and-covid-19-researcher-explains-how-it-keeps-children-safe My time as a medical student showed me that one of the most challenging things a parent can face is a sick child, whether the illness is from dehydration, appendicitis or cancer. The COVID-19 pandemic has also led to childhood hospitalizations. Fortunately, the COVID vaccine offers significant protection. Unvaccinated adolescents were 10 times more likely to be hospitalized … Continue reading Masking in schools: A doctor and COVID-19 researcher explains how it keeps children safe

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2021 was a bad year for glaciers in western North America — and it’s about to get much worse

Brian Menounos, University of Northern British Columbia https://narrations.ad-auris.com/widget/the-conversation-canada/2021-was-a-bad-year-for-glaciers-in-western-north-america-%E2%80%94-and-it-s-about-to-get-much-worse The year 2021 will likely be one of the worst for glaciers in southern British Columbia, Alberta, Washington and Montana. It started out OK. A weak La Niña arrived in the fall of 2020 and continued through the winter. La Niñas tend to favour cool conditions and ample snowfall, so the winter of 2020-21 wasn’t bad for … Continue reading 2021 was a bad year for glaciers in western North America — and it’s about to get much worse